Biography

Remembering Mary Sennholz

Remembering Mary Sennholz

Mary Sennholz—a Grove City College legend and the widow of another GCC legend—passed away peacefully in her sleep early Sunday morning. She was 103, she was ready, and she did it her way: She never moved into a nursing home, … More>

Who was David Rittenhouse? Setting the Record Straight on a Forgotten American Founder

Who was David Rittenhouse? Setting the Record Straight on a Forgotten American Founder

In fictionalized accounts of historical events, writers inevitably project incomplete portraits of characters or recast the characters for dramatic purposes. Historical fiction can be a creative and rewarding means of storytelling and thought-provoking historical commentary. One recent case in which … More>

The Center for Vision & Values Presents: Top 10 of 2016

The Center for Vision & Values Presents: Top 10 of 2016

2016 has been a fantastic year for The Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College. We celebrated an all-time high in website traffic, an exponential growth in social media (approaching 35,000 Facebook fans), and a record number of … More>

Hillary’s Abortion Doctor

Hillary’s Abortion Doctor

Editor’s note: This article first appeared at The American Spectator.

When asked in the last presidential debate what she wanted in a Supreme Court justice, Hillary Clinton did not hesitate to go to abortion. “I want a Supreme Court that … More>

The Great Ty Cobb

The Great Ty Cobb

Editor’s note: A version of this review first appeared at the Claremont Review of Books.

Charles Leerhsen’s “Ty Cobb: A Terrible Beauty” may be the most important baseball book in decades. It is historically significant in two respects: First, it … More>

Men Like Stan Evans

Men Like Stan Evans

Editor’s note: This article first appeared at The American Spectator.

“I need to call Stan,” I told my kids as I dropped them off. It was Sunday, which was always a good day to reach Stan Evans. When he needed … More>

Memories of M. Stanton Evans

Memories of M. Stanton Evans

Journalist M. Stanton Evans passed away at the age of 80 on March 3. Calling him “journalist,” while accurate, isn’t quite adequate. Yes, he became the youngest editor of a major metropolitan daily newspaper when named editor of The Indianapolis … More>

STREAMING VIDEO – 2015 – Ninth Annual Ronald Reagan Lecture

STREAMING VIDEO – 2015 – Ninth Annual Ronald Reagan Lecture

In the Ninth Annual Ronald Reagan Lecture, “Reagan for the Millennials,” best-selling Reagan biographer and executive director of The Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College, Paul Kengor, interviews two special guests: Andrew Coffin ’98, Young America’s Foundation … More>

Remembering James B. Edwards

Remembering James B. Edwards

Editor’s note: This article first appeared at The American Spectator.

On the morning after Christmas, James B. Edwards passed away. Few Americans under the age of 40—unless they are South Carolinians—had probably never heard of Jim.

Here’s the official biography: … More>

God and Dick Scaife

God and Dick Scaife

Editor’s note: This article first appeared in The American Spectator.

I was saddened to wake up the morning of July 4 and learn that Richard Mellon Scaife, Pittsburgh billionaire, conservative philanthropist extraordinaire, and spearhead of Hillary Clinton’s ominous “vast right-wing … More>

STREAMING VIDEO – 2014 – Eighth Annual Ronald Reagan Lecture

STREAMING VIDEO – 2014 – Eighth Annual Ronald Reagan Lecture

In the Eighth Annual Ronald Reagan Lecture—“Reaganomics and the World: Then and Today”—best-selling Reagan biographer and executive director of The Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College—Paul Kengor—interviews two special guests (Art Laffer, champion … More>

STREAMING VIDEO – C-SPAN BOOK-TV – 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative

STREAMING VIDEO – C-SPAN BOOK-TV – 11 Principles of a Reagan Conservative

On February 21, 2014, Dr. Paul Kengor, political science professor at Grove City College and executive director of The Center for Vision & Values, spoke before a sold-out audience at the Reagan Ranch Center in Santa Barbara, California. The event … More>

Pete Seeger, Marxist minstrel

Pete Seeger, Marxist minstrel

Editor’s note: A shorter version of this article first appeared in the Pittsburgh Tribune-Review.

Pete Seeger’s death at age 94 is a cultural catharsis for the American left. The New York Times accorded his passing the kind of space … More>

Bonding over baseball

Bonding over baseball

Editor’s note: Another version of this article first appeared in the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.

My cousin Drew is a 45-year-old veteran of the first Gulf War (1991), which he served aboard a battleship in the Persian Gulf. A former high school … More>

My inheritance

My inheritance

The great 20th century novelist Chaim Potok wrote, in his novel, My Name Is Asher Lev, “You have a gift, Asher Lev. You have a responsibility.” My Mom had a gift of 89 years, 89 years to live her … More>

Alex Karras, RIP

Alex Karras, RIP

Alex Karras, the former Detroit Lions All-Pro defensive tackle and later a successful actor, died on October 10. I have vivid memories of him before he ever gained immortality as “Mongo” in “Blazing Saddles” or as the stepdad of “Webster.”… More>

Barry and the Babe

Barry and the Babe

Barry Bonds’ Dec. 16 sentencing for obstruction of justice is an anticlimactic addendum to a sterling, though marred, baseball career.

Without a doubt, Bonds was a great hitter who didn’t need performance-enhancing drugs to put up Hall of Fame numbers. … More>

A Report from Tuscaloosa’s Ground Zero

A Report from Tuscaloosa’s Ground Zero

The Warrior River borders the University of Alabama campus, separating old Tuscaloosa from up-scale housing developments to the north. Tuscaloosans know a “north of the river” address connotes six-figure incomes. The schools, public and private, are excellent. It’s the country … More>

Where Have You Gone, Ludwig von Mises? Considering Mises: “The Last Knight of Liberalism”

Where Have You Gone, Ludwig von Mises? Considering Mises: “The Last Knight of Liberalism”

Washington’s stunning economic power grabs—healthcare centralization, Keynesian fiscal stimulus, and Federal Reserve bailouts—are creating an unintended consequence: an increasing demand for freedom literature. Exhibit A would have to be F.A. Hayek’s 66-year-old Road to Serfdom’s recently hitting number one for … More>

John Hancock: A Neglected American Hero

John Hancock: A Neglected American Hero

As we celebrate the Fourth of July this year, our attention will once again turn to such luminaries as George Washington, Benjamin Franklin, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and Samuel Adams. However, another founder who made substantial contributions to American independence, … More>

Reagan and Joe

Reagan and Joe

Editor’s note: This article first appeared at National Review, February 6, 2010. This February 6 marks the 99thanniversary of Ronald Reagan’s birth. In a telling development, Republicans around the country have begun holding “Reagan Day” dinners, as they’ve … More>

Norman Borlaug: An American Hero

Norman Borlaug: An American Hero

Editor’s note: A version of this article first appeared with theMackinac Center. Permission to reprint in whole or in part is hereby granted, provided that the author and the Center are properly cited.

Called “arguably the greatest American in … More>

Remembering “The Honz”

Remembering “The Honz”

I was saddened to learn about the death of Fred Honsberger, a Pittsburgh institution who pioneered conservative talk-radio at KDKA-AM, and who was the local forerunner to Rush Limbaugh, Sean Hannity, and the other horses in the conservative stable who … More>

Who Was Nels Konnerup?

Who Was Nels Konnerup?

America honors its deceased presidents, its fallen troops, its late senators, and even its musicians and movie stars. But what about its veterinarians’

Well, there’s one veterinarian who deserves pause for recognition. His name was Nels Konnerup. He recently passed … More>

“The Politics of Laura Ingalls Wilder”

“The Politics of Laura Ingalls Wilder”

On September 28, 2009, Dr. John J. Fry—chair of the history department at Trinity Christian College in Palos Heights, IL—will be speaking in the Sticht Lecture Hall of the Hall of Arts and Letters on the Grove City College campus. … More>

Listening to Frankenstein

Listening to Frankenstein

At this very time of year, on a dreary night, and during a lightning storm, Victor Frankenstein first gave life to his hideous creation in Mary Shelley’s tragic novel. And so was born both the connection between Halloween and Frankenstein … More>

Olympic Anecdotes

Olympic Anecdotes

After lying dormant for more than 22 centuries, the modern Olympic Games were launched in 1896. Held in Athens (of course!), the first modern Olympiad attracted the largest crowd ever to have assembled for a sporting event. The athletes were … More>

John Templeton, R.I.P.

John Templeton, R.I.P.

Sir John Marks Templeton passed from this world on July 8. In an extraordinary life of 95 years, John Templeton was one of the world’s wealthiest individuals, most successful investors, most generous philanthropists, and a tireless seeker for spiritual truth.… More>

Easter with Mr. Buckley

Easter with Mr. Buckley

Like many people, I suppose, my bookshelves are filled with books I’ve purchased with plans to read someday, sometime … but not right now. A couple of weeks ago, I grabbed one of those books, bought almost 10 years ago, … More>

Bill Buckley’s Defiance of Big History

Bill Buckley’s Defiance of Big History

One probably had to live through the times to better appreciate the real significance of William F. Buckley. A deserving plethora of encomia—wouldn’t he use a word like this?—currently suffuses conservative media outlets, cataloguing the great man’s kindness, humility, extraordinary … More>

The Faith of George Washington

The Faith of George Washington

On July 9, 1755, the “most catastrophic” day in Anglo-American history, Colonel George Washington was traveling with General Edward Braddock’s army toward Fort Duquesne when they were ambushed by Indians and French hiding in the woods. In the ensuing massacre, … More>

A Child’s Special Gift

A Child’s Special Gift

It is a statement of the obvious—both trite and troublesome—to acknowledge that most children today generally receive more than they need at Christmas, especially compared to children of times past, and particularly in America. They know the joy of receiving … More>

The Professor, the Prankster, and the President

The Professor, the Prankster, and the President

“What do we have here? A student from (a nearby college)?” bellowed the irritated and hugely popular and internationally-known economics professor in his thick German accent. A student in Dr. Hans Sennholz’s Grove City College economics class had not yet … More>

Samuel Adams: The Indispensable Man

Samuel Adams: The Indispensable Man

As we celebrate the 4th  of July with fireworks, parades, cookouts, and speeches, we should be grateful to our many forebears who risked their property, reputation, and lives to attain our independence. Some of them are well known and highly … More>

A Tribute to Hans F. Sennholz

A Tribute to Hans F. Sennholz Guest Commentary

Great teachers leave lifelong impressions on the students they inspire. Their teachings become their students’ teachings, thereby spreading their influence in endless directions and across many generations. Hans F. Sennholz was such a man. The thousands who sat … More>

Reflections on Hans F. Sennholz

Reflections on Hans F. Sennholz

Dr. Hans F. Sennholz, economist par excellence, prolific author, dynamic lecturer, legendary Grove City College professor for 37 years, passed away on June 23 at age 85. How does one encapsulate such a long, productive, remarkable life? You may … More>

Boris Yeltsin and the Horror House

Boris Yeltsin and the Horror House

Former Russian President Boris Yeltsin died this week at age 76, on the heels of two decades of both extraordinary health problems and political achievements.

His presidency ran from June 1991 through December 31, 1999—almost the entirety of the 1990s, … More>

Hating Rick

Hating Rick

Back in November, on the heels of the landslide defeat of Senator Rick Santorum (R-PA) by Democratic challenger Bob Casey, Jr., I wrote an article recalling the first time I met Santorum. I intended the piece to be a personal … More>

The Faith of Abraham Lincoln

The Faith of Abraham Lincoln

The celebration of Presidents Day is a good occasion to reconsider a vital aspect of Abraham Lincoln’s life: his faith. Like George Washington’s, Lincoln’s faith has been closely scrutinized, hotly debated and often misunderstood. Both men attributed their success in … More>

The Rise and Fall of a Dictator

The Rise and Fall of a Dictator “I expect to die a violent death, with nothing but the tip of my pinky finger remaining behind.”
—Saddam Hussein

Saddam Hussein grew up barefoot in a mud hut in the town of Takrit, north of Baghdad on the Tigris … More>

MILTON FRIEDMAN, 1912-2006

MILTON FRIEDMAN, 1912-2006

Few American economists have wielded as much influence on economic thought and policy as the late Milton Friedman. He was an articulate and ardent advocate of free markets and personal liberty. In 1962, his CAPITAL AND FREEDOM, which continues … More>

Some Guy Named Santorum

Some Guy Named Santorum

I will never forget the first time I heard of Rick Santorum. It was 1990 and I was a student at the University of Pittsburgh, where I was editorial page editor of the campus newspaper. I was approached by Tara … More>

V&V Fellow Featured in Groundbreaking Documentary

V&V Fellow Featured in Groundbreaking Documentary

Noted military historian and Fellow for the Middle East & Terrorism with the Center for Vision & Values at Grove City College—Dr. Earl Tilford—was featured alongside prominent scholars and commentators in a groundbreaking documentary produced by Coral Ridge Ministries. The … More>

Goodbye to a Good Guy

Goodbye to a Good Guy

Editor’s Note: Bob O’Connor, the 58th mayor of Pittsburgh, PA, died of brain cancer this past Friday, September 1, at the age of 61.

In the fall of 1994, I drove my tiny Toyota Tercel into downtown Pittsburgh for a … More>

Weinberger’s Wisdom

Weinberger’s Wisdom

On Monday evening, March 27, I spoke to students in my “Modern Civilization” course here at Grove City College. I was lecturing on the origins of the Cold War. I began talking about the Berlin Wall, going through the date … More>

A “Foote” Note of History

A “Foote” Note of History

With the arrival of a national holiday, concomitant weekend getaways, and the ceaseless pounding of sensationalistic news headlines, it sadly becomes far too easy to miss the passing of an age. And, in fact, that has just happened when at … More>

The Human Kennan

The Human Kennan

A giant of the 20th century died on Thursday, March 17. George F. Kennan lived for 101 years. Many things will be said of Kennan this week: He was a leading thinker of our time, the founding father of containment, … More>

A Mom Who Made a President

A Mom Who Made a President

While being a mother has never been easy, the task today is particularly daunting. My wife, who is the mother of my 8-year-old and 6-year-old sons and 2-year-old daughter, learned a few months ago that she couldn’t even let her … More>

Remembering Fyodor Dostoevsky

Remembering Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor Dostoevsky-one of the greatest writers of Western Civilization-was born 182 years ago on November 11th. Into his novels-works of art in their own right-he infused philosophy, theology, psychology, criminology, and a profound understanding of human nature.

Dostoevsky’s career began … More>

Celebrating John Milton: A Sequoia Among Shrubs

Celebrating John Milton: A Sequoia Among Shrubs

Periodically, brushfires sweep through the sequoia forests of California. Rangers once feared that the fires would harm the sequoias; instead, the fires not only cleared out the smaller trees and underbrush; they actually strengthened the sequoias. Such is the case … More>

A Grover by Another Name

A Grover by Another Name

He’s 19 or 20 years old and a Marine Rifleman fighting in Iraq. His hair’s cut “high and tight” and he’s muscled, weighs about 150 pounds on average. He’d get carded in a bar and in six or seven years … More>

Have You Asked Hannibal?

Have You Asked Hannibal?

There’s a serial killer in Louisiana who kidnaps, rapes and murders women. Another may be active in the Los Angeles area. Have the police in Louisiana and Los Angeles-and presumably the F.B.I.-gone to Anthony Hopkins for advice?

Who would know … More>

Remembering Mr. Rogers

Remembering Mr. Rogers

I was quite saddened when I woke up on Thursday morning, turned on Channel 4 and learned that Fred Rogers had died. Mr. Rogers had always evoked sentimentality from me, though never as he did that morning.

I’ll always have … More>