Posts by Mark W. Hendrickson

Memories of M. Stanton Evans

Memories of M. Stanton Evans

Journalist M. Stanton Evans passed away at the age of 80 on March 3. Calling him “journalist,” while accurate, isn’t quite adequate. Yes, he became the youngest editor of a major metropolitan daily newspaper when named editor of The Indianapolis … More>

Remembering James B. Edwards

Remembering James B. Edwards

Editor’s note: This article first appeared at The American Spectator.

On the morning after Christmas, James B. Edwards passed away. Few Americans under the age of 40—unless they are South Carolinians—had probably never heard of Jim.

Here’s the official biography: … More>

Truth and Fiction at Christmastime

Truth and Fiction at Christmastime

It strikes me that fiction plays a major role in our annual Christmastime celebrations. Our little children hear far more about Santa Claus, Rudolph the red-nosed reindeer, and other fictitious characters than about the Nativity. I don’t mean that as … More>

A miracle or coincidence?

A miracle or coincidence?

Editor’s Note: This article first appeared at Forbes.com.

Every now and then, something unforeseen and special happens—something that logic or reason would tell you is either impossible or that the odds against it happening are overwhelming. And yet those things … More>

Alex Karras, RIP

Alex Karras, RIP

Alex Karras, the former Detroit Lions All-Pro defensive tackle and later a successful actor, died on October 10. I have vivid memories of him before he ever gained immortality as “Mongo” in “Blazing Saddles” or as the stepdad of “Webster.”… More>

A Whiff of Privatization

A Whiff of Privatization

Three decades ago, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher implemented a policy called “privatization” to rejuvenate the moribund economy of the United Kingdom.

Like the United States today, the cost of a too-large government was sapping the vitality of the U.K.’s economy. … More>

Barry and the Babe

Barry and the Babe

Barry Bonds’ Dec. 16 sentencing for obstruction of justice is an anticlimactic addendum to a sterling, though marred, baseball career.

Without a doubt, Bonds was a great hitter who didn’t need performance-enhancing drugs to put up Hall of Fame numbers. … More>

We’ve Been ZIRPed

We’ve Been ZIRPed

It isn’t easy to earn interest income these days. Interest rates on government T-bills, banks’ savings accounts, and certificates of deposit are microscopic. You can blame our government and central bank. They have “ZIRPed” millions of American savers. Here are … More>

Big Deal or No Big Deal?

Big Deal or No Big Deal?

As the August 2 deadline for a debt-ceiling deal drew near, many expected a big deal that would significantly change the direction of federal fiscal policy. After weeks of tumultuous negotiations, partisan bickering, and impassioned histrionics, the agreement that finally … More>

Thanks, Pop

Thanks, Pop

Father’s Day is a poignant occasion for me, as for many. I never knew my biological father, who died in an accident. Mom and I lived near Detroit with her oldest sister and her husband, who were childless. That’s how … More>

Swindling America’s Youth

Swindling America’s Youth

We older Americans have saddled our youth with a mind-boggling public debt—over $20 trillion already spent ($14.3 trillion of “official” national debt plus various off-budget expenditures, according to the U.S. Treasury); trillions more of projected deficit-spending over the coming decade; … More>

Millionaires in America

Millionaires in America

Recently, CNN’s Money.com posted an article bearing the title, “U.S. Millionaires Population Expanded by 8 Percent in 2010.” According to the article, there are now approximately 8.4 million millionaires in the United States, and last year’s increase was due primarily … More>

Imperfect Justice in Snyder v. Phelps

Imperfect Justice in Snyder v. Phelps

On March 2, the Supreme Court issued a decision in the case Snyder v. Phelps that illustrates the difficulty of balancing competing claims to rights and justice in our judicial system.

The court overturned a lower court’s $5 million tort … More>

Breakdown

Breakdown

You’ve probably seen the headlines about major banks suspending foreclosure proceedings to reclaim houses from borrowers who have defaulted on their mortgages. This has the potential to be hugely disruptive—a milestone development comparable to the failure of Lehman Brothers in … More>

Let Us Give Thanks

Let Us Give Thanks

As we celebrate our national Thanksgiving holiday in 2009, are you feeling worry, fear, anger, or despair about the direction of our country? Let us instead give thanks.

As we pass through this temporal world of “tares and wheat,” we … More>

The Coming of Caesar

The Coming of Caesar

We have a problem. This could be “the big one”—bigger than coping with theAhmadinejads, Kims, and Chavezes of the world and bigger than our current economic woes. Our republic, our society, may be heading for a crackup. We are bankrupt, … More>

Sex, Life, and Death

Sex, Life, and Death

Two summers ago, while passing through an airport, I caught a TV news story: double homicide in Ohio. The victims were a young woman and the nine-month-old fetus she was carrying. The murderer was her lover, the unborn baby’s father.… More>

Cap-and-Trade Update

Cap-and-Trade Update

On Sept. 30, Senators Barbara Boxer (D-CA) and John Kerry (D-MA) unveiled their proposal for cap-and-trade (C&T) legislation. The Senate bill calls for a 20 percent reduction of U.S. CO2 emissions by 2020, and an 80 percent reduction by 2050—targets … More>

Truth and Politics

Truth and Politics

Many of us are cynical about promises made by politicians. “Campaign promises are made to be broken” is a venerable truism of American politics. There are “truth-in-advertising” laws against misrepresentation by private businesses, but no such protections apply to political … More>

Monetary Madness

Monetary Madness

China, Russia, et al. are talking about shifting their monetary reserves out of U.S. dollars. Gold has hit $1000 per ounce, even though wholesale and retail prices exhibit a deflationary bias. The United Nations has called for a new world … More>

No Laughing Matter

No Laughing Matter

Who won the Cold War? That’s a no-brainer. The United States prevailed while the Soviet Union collapsed, and the People’s Republic of China dumped Marxism; capitalism (free markets and private property) triumphed over socialism (centrally planned markets and state-owned property); … More>

Checkmate?

Checkmate?

Some people I know react with incredulity when they hear television commentators remark on President Barack Obama’s brilliance. “How can he say that?” they expostulate. “He doesn’t understand basic economics, and he relies on a teleprompter even during news conferences. … More>

Two Americas?

Two Americas?

One of the favorite refrains of the class-warfare left has long been to lament what it perceives as a division in America between economic haves and have-nots. From the standpoint of egalitarian, socialistic philosophy, the fact that some Americans prosper … More>

More Bailouts, More Fed

More Bailouts, More Fed

In the last week, the Treasury Department and the Federal Reserve each announced a major policy initiative for the stated purpose of reversing our economic woes. Don’t hold your breath.

The Treasury’s gambit is a proposed public-private partnership to remove … More>

Anger at AIG

Anger at AIG

A raw nerve was struck this week. Reports that employees of the insurance giant AIG—the recipient of four federal bailouts totaling more than $170 billion—were now receiving $165 million in bonuses, caused an explosion of public anger, even bloodthirsty rage. … More>

Into the Fiscal Abyss

Into the Fiscal Abyss

The U.S. Treasury recently released its “2008 Financial Report of the United States Government.” In case you had any doubts, our government’s finances are in a terrible mess. According to the report, under generally accepted accounting principles (the ones that … More>

Tough Times for Wise Virgins

Tough Times for Wise Virgins

The biblical parable of the 10 virgins (Matthew 25:1-12) is particularly relevant today. As you may recall, the five wise virgins behaved responsibly and prudently, making sure they had enough lamp oil for the midnight arrival of the bridegroom. The … More>

The Problem With Monotheism

The Problem With Monotheism

When an author argues that there is no God, that’s his personal business—something between him and the Creator. But when an author, in addition to denying God, asserts that monotheism is a net negative for the human race, a rebuttal … More>

The End Game

The End Game

If you wanted to turn the United States of America into a socialist country, what strategy would you adopt? Joseph Stalin, the world’s top communist from 1924 to 1953, is reputed to have advocated the following strategy to William Z. … More>

We’re Broke

We’re Broke

Global stock markets have been plummeting. Where the bottom is, nobody knows. There will be gut-wrenching zigs and hopeful zags along the way; they will be of larger magnitude and—in our digital age of instant response—will occur with greater rapidity … More>

Economic Nonsense

Economic Nonsense

It saddens me when I see a member of my profession go over to “the dark side,” that is, to politics. Politics replaces voluntary action with compulsion, private contract with coercion. Government intervention imposes distortions, inefficiencies, and extra costs on … More>

The Power of the Media

The Power of the Media

So powerful are the media that they have been referred to as the fourth branch of government. Indeed, they can make or break reputations. Example: when former Vice President Dan Quayle misspelled “potato” by adding an “e,” the press magnified … More>

Olympic Anecdotes

Olympic Anecdotes

After lying dormant for more than 22 centuries, the modern Olympic Games were launched in 1896. Held in Athens (of course!), the first modern Olympiad attracted the largest crowd ever to have assembled for a sporting event. The athletes were … More>

Drill Now

Drill Now

High fuel prices have produced a tectonic shift in the United States’ political landscape. Recent polls indicate a strong surge of support for Uncle Sam lifting government restrictions against domestic drilling for oil. Blocking the development of domestic energy resources … More>

Here We Go Again

Here We Go Again

Every year, Merriam-Webster, the dictionary company, holds a vote for “Word of the Year.” Don’t be surprised if 2008’s word is “bailout.” And if they start a “Phrase of the Year” category, how about “Too big to fail?” We heard … More>

John Templeton, R.I.P.

John Templeton, R.I.P.

Sir John Marks Templeton passed from this world on July 8. In an extraordinary life of 95 years, John Templeton was one of the world’s wealthiest individuals, most successful investors, most generous philanthropists, and a tireless seeker for spiritual truth.… More>

El Cinco de Mayo

El Cinco de Mayo

Cinco de Mayo (5th of May) festivities are to Mexican-Americans what St. Patrick’s Day festivities are to Irish-Americans—a joyful expression of ancestral pride and a celebration of the rich diversity of American culture. Mexican-Americans, like Irish-Americans, migrated to the United … More>

More or Less?

More or Less?

Thank you, Rahm Emanuel! Mr. Emanuel, a Democratic congressman from Illinois and former senior policy adviser to President Clinton, recently published several election-year policy proposals on the opinion page of The Wall Street Journal.

The timing of Emanuel’s article … More>

Atheism Versus the Resurrection

Atheism Versus the Resurrection

In recent years, it has become fashionable among secular journals to mark Easter week by publishing articles denying that Jesus Christ was resurrected from the tomb. It seems they can always find someone with the credentials of a Christian minister … More>

Thoughts of Thanksgiving

Thoughts of Thanksgiving

Thanksgiving is the quintessential American holiday. It fuses the secular and the sacred—that special synthesis that forms our national identity. Our celebration of a Day of Thanksgiving underscores both our commonality, as citizens of one republic, and our diversity, as … More>

Congress to the Energy Rescue?

Congress to the Energy Rescue?

Americans are hoping and praying for relief from rising gasoline, oil and electricity prices. We are uncomfortable importing so much of our raw energy supplies from unstable parts of the world. Many of our compatriots, not understanding the minuscule impact … More>

Movie review: “Hairspray”

Movie review: “Hairspray”

“Hairspray”—the film adaptation of the Broadway musical of the same name—is trite and formulaic. Some of its key characters are mere caricatures. I can’t remember the words or melody of any of its songs. And on top of that, I … More>

The Liberal Temptation

The Liberal Temptation

In 2005, the Center for Vision and Values hosted a conference about poverty in the United States and different approaches to alleviating it. During the Q&A session after one of the presentations, a Grove City College student asked what actions … More>

China as Scapegoat

China as Scapegoat

Recently (“Exchange-Rate Politics,” July 23), I warned that U.S. senators were playing with fire by trying to strong-arm China into speeding up the rate at which the yuan strengthens vis-à-vis the dollar. On August 8, the Chinese responded. In dignified … More>

Reflections on Hans F. Sennholz

Reflections on Hans F. Sennholz

Dr. Hans F. Sennholz, economist par excellence, prolific author, dynamic lecturer, legendary Grove City College professor for 37 years, passed away on June 23 at age 85. How does one encapsulate such a long, productive, remarkable life? You may … More>

Questions About Global Warming

Questions About Global Warming

For those who believe in the global warming (GW) theory (i.e., that human activity is heating the planet to dangerous levels) the ace of trump has been played. On Groundhog Day 2007, the U.N.’s Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) … More>